Sweetheart Seer Books

PREDICTING YOUR NEXT GREAT READ

“Convenience Store Woman” by: Sayaka Murata

I loved every single thing about this book! I listened to it on audio and the narrator did SUCH a great job performing this!

It was intriguing to read from the perspective of a person not quite knowing how to be a human, that she felt very outcast for not conforming to social norms and not thinking the way that most other people do!

I could relate to her for that so much and felt very represented in the not quite fitting in aspect. Now granted, she wasn’t exactly like me, but that’s part of the fun of reading fiction! Getting different perspectives!

Anyways, I had wondered if given her particular qualities and characteristics if she was on the spectrum, has autism or possibly aspergers, but this was never mentioned. I am glad actually because sometimes giving your character a diagnosis sort of lumps them into pretty conceived notions and stereotypes as a reader. I was able to take in the story as it stood you could say.

Right away after I finished the book, I paused for a brief moment and then I literally started it over to relisten!

(I HAVE NEVER EVER DONE THIS BEFORE AND FELT ODDLY SATISFIED IN DOING SO CAUSE ITS MY READING AND I CAN DO IT HOW I WANT TO!)

Ahem, so the story itself was a fun sort of slice of life story and funny without outright trying to be. It was quirky and lovely and I connected SO MUCH to her! I was rooting for her to not give into society standards and that ending had me cheering her on for being herself and making her own choice! ♡

Goodreads Synopsis:

Keiko Furukura had always been considered a strange child, and her parents always worried how she would get on in the real world, so when she takes on a job in a convenience store while at university, they are delighted for her. For her part, in the convenience store she finds a predictable world mandated by the store manual, which dictates how the workers should act and what they should say, and she copies her coworkers’ style of dress and speech patterns so she can play the part of a normal person. However, eighteen years later, at age 36, she is still in the same job, has never had a boyfriend, and has only few friends. She feels comfortable in her life but is aware that she is not living up to society’s expectations and causing her family to worry about her. When a similarly alienated but cynical and bitter young man comes to work in the store, he will upset Keiko’s contented stasis—but will it be for the better?

Sayaka Murata brilliantly captures the atmosphere of the familiar convenience store that is so much part of life in Japan. With some laugh-out-loud moments prompted by the disconnect between Keiko’s thoughts and those of the people around her, she provides a sharp look at Japanese society and the pressure to conform, as well as penetrating insights into the female mind. Convenience Store Woman is a fresh, charming portrait of an unforgettable heroine that recalls Banana Yoshimoto, Han Kang, and Amelie

Categories: Published, Reviews